Brave new world revisited essays

Jade Chang's debut novel, "The Wangs Vs. The World," hit bestseller lists last fall. We catch up with the Angeleno to find out how her life has changed.

The novel repeatedly explains that the reason for such advanced technology is to keep workers busy manufacturing products. Interestingly though, the citizens of the World State could enjoy significantly better devices. In a conversation towards the end of the novel, World Controller Mustapha Mond explains to John that countless plans and designs for more advanced technologies already exist. The World State could, he explains, synthetically manufacture all of its food products and use highly efficient labour-saving machines. However, more advanced technology is not developed, as the World Controllers fear that high-tech machines would result in people having too much time on their hands. This, explains Mond, is not in the World State's best interests, following a previous experiment in Ireland , which revealed that more advanced technology simply led to widespread boredom and increased use of soma . Although the citizens of Brave New World enjoy apparently very advanced gadgets, they are unaware that human technology has in fact been limited artificially.

Other links which may be of interest to readers who were pointed here:

  • Full text of the foreword to Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death , which the comic was inspired by.
  • A 60 minute lecture by Neil Postman on technology and society.
  • A Guardian article about George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four writing process .
Back to post / website . View/add comments for this article . Amusing Ourselves to Death by Stuart McMillen. Aldous Huxley vs. George Orwell. What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions". In 1984, Huxley added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us. All words by "Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business" by Neil Postman...a book about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell was right.

The biographer suspects that the students may have led overlapping sex lives forming a club called The Hypocrites in which partner sharing was a feature.

Mustapha Mond – Resident World Controller of Western Europe, "His Fordship" Mustapha Mond presides over one of the ten zones of the World State, the global government set up after the cataclysmic Nine Years' War and great Economic Collapse. Sophisticated and good-natured, Mond is an urbane and hyperintelligent advocate of the World State and its ethos of "Community, Identity, Stability". He is uniquely aware among the characters of the novel of the precise nature of the society he oversees and what it has given up to accomplish its gains. Mond argues that art, literature, and scientific freedom must be sacrificed to secure the ultimate utilitarian goal of maximising societal happiness. He defends the genetic caste system, behavioural conditioning, and the lack of personal freedom in the World State: these, he says, are a price worth paying for achieving social stability, the highest social virtue because it leads to lasting happiness.

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brave new world revisited essays

Brave new world revisited essays

The biographer suspects that the students may have led overlapping sex lives forming a club called The Hypocrites in which partner sharing was a feature.

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brave new world revisited essays

Brave new world revisited essays

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brave new world revisited essays

Brave new world revisited essays

Other links which may be of interest to readers who were pointed here:

  • Full text of the foreword to Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death , which the comic was inspired by.
  • A 60 minute lecture by Neil Postman on technology and society.
  • A Guardian article about George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four writing process .
Back to post / website . View/add comments for this article . Amusing Ourselves to Death by Stuart McMillen. Aldous Huxley vs. George Orwell. What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions". In 1984, Huxley added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us. All words by "Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business" by Neil Postman...a book about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell was right.

Action Action

brave new world revisited essays
Brave new world revisited essays

The biographer suspects that the students may have led overlapping sex lives forming a club called The Hypocrites in which partner sharing was a feature.

Action Action

Brave new world revisited essays

Action Action

brave new world revisited essays

Brave new world revisited essays

The novel repeatedly explains that the reason for such advanced technology is to keep workers busy manufacturing products. Interestingly though, the citizens of the World State could enjoy significantly better devices. In a conversation towards the end of the novel, World Controller Mustapha Mond explains to John that countless plans and designs for more advanced technologies already exist. The World State could, he explains, synthetically manufacture all of its food products and use highly efficient labour-saving machines. However, more advanced technology is not developed, as the World Controllers fear that high-tech machines would result in people having too much time on their hands. This, explains Mond, is not in the World State's best interests, following a previous experiment in Ireland , which revealed that more advanced technology simply led to widespread boredom and increased use of soma . Although the citizens of Brave New World enjoy apparently very advanced gadgets, they are unaware that human technology has in fact been limited artificially.

Action Action

brave new world revisited essays

Brave new world revisited essays

Other links which may be of interest to readers who were pointed here:

  • Full text of the foreword to Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death , which the comic was inspired by.
  • A 60 minute lecture by Neil Postman on technology and society.
  • A Guardian article about George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four writing process .
Back to post / website . View/add comments for this article . Amusing Ourselves to Death by Stuart McMillen. Aldous Huxley vs. George Orwell. What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions". In 1984, Huxley added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us. All words by "Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business" by Neil Postman...a book about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell was right.

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brave new world revisited essays

Brave new world revisited essays

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Brave new world revisited essays

Mustapha Mond – Resident World Controller of Western Europe, "His Fordship" Mustapha Mond presides over one of the ten zones of the World State, the global government set up after the cataclysmic Nine Years' War and great Economic Collapse. Sophisticated and good-natured, Mond is an urbane and hyperintelligent advocate of the World State and its ethos of "Community, Identity, Stability". He is uniquely aware among the characters of the novel of the precise nature of the society he oversees and what it has given up to accomplish its gains. Mond argues that art, literature, and scientific freedom must be sacrificed to secure the ultimate utilitarian goal of maximising societal happiness. He defends the genetic caste system, behavioural conditioning, and the lack of personal freedom in the World State: these, he says, are a price worth paying for achieving social stability, the highest social virtue because it leads to lasting happiness.

Action Action

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Brave new world revisited essays

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